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there was a terrorist attack on america. and though we suffered a horrific attack, the strength, resilience and extraordinary acts of kindness of the american people showed the world that attempts to destroy our way of life would never succeed. on that day, no one could get in or out of washington, and many communication networks were inoperable. so when the pentagon was hit, and the capitol was evacuated, my staff and i walked one block to my home on capitol hill. just as example, the husband of my office manager worked in the section of the pentagon had been hit, so we were on the phone, the one phone that we had, the hospitals, the police, anyone that we thought might be able to tell us if he was safe. thankfully, he was fine. but there were so many who waited for hours, who called hospitals to hear from their loved ones. sometimes the news was a relief, and sometimes they waited in vain for good news. and i have to say that it was an incredible moment when the senators who could find each other, where ever they had gone from the capital, we finally gathered early -- well, late afternoon
, philadelphia, new york city, boston, the most congested corridor in the united states of america, that is the only 600 miles that we really own. we another small stretches around the commuter -- all the rest of amtrak service, over 20,000 miles of private freight rail. i see the main rail people in the audience and they have concerns too about using theirs and not having dedicated them and we need to address that issue as we move forward. final point is northeast quarter is where we should be putting the focus. give the administration credit for at least taking the money that has been turned back dedicating so that to the northeast quarter but we are doing it in a piecemeal, half baked fashion. the northeast corridor, every state, every major area can benefit by bringing high-speed rail to the northeast corridor. 70% of our air traffic delays emanate from the northeast corridor even when we have next-generation air traffic control, move planes faster and closer together with doubling of air-traffic, all of the other restrictions we have in that corridor, you must have high-speed
their and right here in the united states of america. after eight years of this from the republicans, president barack obama committed real money to improve our nation's rail system including the development of high-speed rail and low and behold the same members who did not dedicate 1 since to high-speed rail when they are in charge are complaining that the money wasn't spent the way they want it to be spent. mr. mica's unhealthy obsession with privatizing the northeast corridor has limited support and violates the u.s. constitution. the chairman privatizing language in the investment and improvement act of 2008, no private sector proposal for the northeast corridor and his competition introduced last year determined by the nonpartisan congressional research service to be a violation of the appointment clause of the constitution that would raise costs on states and commuter authorities and eliminate long distance service. we need truth high-speed rail in the northeast corridor. we need to have a serious conversation about how this should happen and those hearings focus solely on privatizing wit
editor craig whitney on the history of gun ownership and then control in america from living with guns:a liberal's case for the second amendment saturday night at 10:00 eastern on booktv's afterwards, part of four days of nonfiction books and authors on c-span2. >> democratic senator daniel inouye died monday at the age of 88. the senate's senior member was serving his seventh term. tribute continued yesterday. this portion is an hour. >> first, my friend, chairman of the judiciary committee has been honored to receive one of the senate's high honors in the senate, i congratulate him on that. join with him in expressing my sadness over the passing of senator daniel inouye. he came to this government starting government service, 60 years ago in the territorial legislature of hawaii and came to congress when hawaii became a state in 59 and the senate in 63, only in service to robert bird -- to robert byrd. this is a serious man, a solid man, patriot, and one who always had a good spirit about how he conducted his affairs and how he related to other members of the senate and his constitue
of the world in ruins, but least america squarely in the center of the revolution for the first time in our history. yet, on the horizon was the greatest economic depression this nation had faced or has faced since. his mother, his mother, the first of her generation in hawaii, his father an Émigre from japan. at a time when there was strong and prejudices still in existence in america, a man who came of age as the secondary burst upon the scene, and that very prejudiced against japanese-americans reached a crescendo. december 7, 1942, as the majority leader alluded to, on the way to mass, or on the way to church with her grandfather listening to your radio about the bombing that was taking place in pearl harbor. first as danny told the story, over several times, he thought it was the most -- he and his father drove, he could see, could see pearl harbor, the bombs bursting. he was then labeled and any alien. he was labeled an enemy alien as his family was. because of his japanese ancest ancestry. but he thought for the chance to fight for his country. he had to fight for the chance to figh
or the united states of america. mr. speaker, more jobs means that the impact of the weaker than forecast gdp on the public finances have been less than some might have expected. there have been three developments that have each had a significant one-off impact on the public finances, and in the report today we publish clearly and transparently the impacts of all three. first, there is the transfer of the royal mail pension fund to the public sector at part of its privatization. this produces a one-off reduction in the deficit of 28 billion pounds this year, but it adds to the deficit in the years afterwards. second, the previous goth had class -- government had classified northern rock asset management as off balance sheet. today it is brought on balance sheet in line with the office of national statistics. this adds about 70 billion pounds to our national debt and reminds us of the price the country is still paying for the failures of the past. third, the government as decided -- has decided, third, the government has decided with the agreement of the bank of england to transfer excess cash
for the express purpose of operations in latin america. so as a culture, we've got to be careful that we don't jettison those hard-won lessons and capabilities we have in our professional force now as i would argue we did to an extent rebuilding ourselves in the 1970s and '90s. as an institution. and that is my opinion. i think we're at that inflection point now where you've heard the president says it, you've heard the secretary say it. rebalancing toward the asia pacific region has a bunch of logical lines and thought process to that. it serves kind of that focus, i think, quite frankly, on the army. i think in the road ahead you've got to keep the foundation of what we do as brigades, infantry forces intact. do those lessons learned that i think the emphasis on mission command is probably the most important thing we've won out of iraq and afghanistan as an army. and that is the ability of trust to be decentralized in it planning, preparation and execution to very low levels. when i came in, first unit with the 82nd airborne at fort bragging, there was only a -- fort bragg, there was only
the region is secure but our interests, united states of america's interests are safe as we'll. without i yield to my colleague, mr. meeks. >> thank you, mr. chairman. and i want to thank you for holding as you said this most important hearing. but i also want to say to a degree sad, that because this probably will be your last hearing here in the united states house of representatives after almost three decades of service to our country, and we want to salute you for that. some, you know, maybe with regret not having used to stick around anymore. but we indeed are going to miss you, and i have to say that it's been an honor and a personal privilege for me to sit as a ranking member and to work with you over the last few years on the subcommittee. you have been a chairman that has been very fair and open, and we work together and you will be missed here. and so i hope that as you retire, you enjoyed a fruitful and prosperous life with your beautiful wife who is here, and your family. you have a great retirement, and maybe now they will have the time to schedule a round of golf with bill c
world works, that they had been responsible for losing america, aaa credit rating, the first time in its history and barack obama was in his words and amateur. i spoke to two people who were at that meeting. when i heard that i said "the amateur" is the perfect title for this book. >> host: president clinton has denied publicly used that term. >> guest: he has denied it but hillary has told her friends that she suspected of all people, chelsea had told me about this. that is not true. i never met chelsea clinton but apparently chelsea has a reputation talking to friends in the middle of meetings with her parents but it was a confirmation that the meeting did take place and it was an accurate representation of what went on during the meeting. >> host: you talk about chelsea clinton's reaction to the 2008 presidential primary on the democratic side. >> guest: chelsea like bill, her father, they're very close, fell that the democratic nomination was practically stolen from her mother, that she deserved to be the presidential candidate, not barack obama, and the obamas had unfairly character
, the bill of rights creation and reconstruction, america's constitution a biography and most recently america's unwritten constitution, the president's and decibels we live by. the honorable clarence thomas has served as an associate justice of the supreme court of the united states for nearly 21 years. he attended conceptual cemetery and received an a.b. from the college of the holy cross and his j.d. from yale law school. he served as an assistant attorney general of missouri from 1974 to 1977, an attorney with the monsanto company from 77 to 79 and legislative assistant to senator john danforth from 1979 to 1981. from 1981 to 1982 he served as assistant secretary for civil rights in the u.s. department of education and chairman of the u.s. equal opportunity commission from 1982 to 1990. he became a judge of the u.s. court of appeals and in the district of columbia circuit in 1990. president bush nominated him as associate justice of the supreme court and he took his seat on october 23, 1991. ladies and gentlemen please welcome justice thomas and professor amar to the stage. [applau
in the administration, there is no one in the administration who is more focused on america's long-term competitiveness, short term competitiveness, midterm competitiveness, when the president is talking about issues which are critical to him, america maintains its edges in the global economy, and all of its citizens to students to people dreaming about being the next generation of innovators, policies that helped achieve that. higher education k-12, insuring universities are still leading and citizenry is well s was sub human capital, not the best term. and achieving their dream, gene has been focused on those issues like no other. at brookings, education around the world and has written extensively about education in the united states. he is obviously enmeshed in debates on the fiscal cliff but we brought him here today to talk about long-term challenges and how we connect the dots. with that, gene sperling. [applause] >> thank you very much. it is intimidating to have already followed your panel. i like much more when you get to be the first person to mention every idea and the panel's save as gene
of america ceo brian moynihan. that is why on c-span at 10:00 eastern. >> the white house was very controversial as most things in america were. there was competition, he submitted a design for a palace, america having a palace, it was not particularly awe inspiring. in 1821, a european diplomat told congress it was neither large nor awe inspiring but the answer, the congressman gave said the building serves its purpose. if it were larger and more elegant perhaps some president would be inclined to become its permanent resident. >> former new york times photo critics vicki goldberg has gathered her favorite white house photos in the white house, the president's home in photographs in history. sunday evening at 7:30 eastern and pacific on american history tv on c-span3. >> now a hearing on the conflict in the eastern congo. house foreign affairs subcommittee is looking into the administration's efforts to resolve the crisis in the region and rwanda's support of congolese rebels. this is a little more than 2-1/2 hours. >> we will come to order and good afternoon. i apologize for the
that we should be telling morsi, look, there's already a lot of skepticism about you in america because, you know, we've read the muslim brotherhood documents historically, and they're not consistent with our values. but, okay, you won the election, so, um, and it's very important for us to have good relations between egypt and the united states. you're a great nation, you're the center of the arab world, but, you know, we're going to judge you not by your title, but by your actions. and to be more specific, as grateful as we were two weeks ago that you, um, mr. president morsi, helped us end the conflict in gaza, um, if the next day or two days after you suspend the right of judicial review, etc., etc., we're not going to be able to have normal relations with you. and probably if i was in the white house, i'd say, mr. president morsi, no matter what we in the white house wanted to do, those lunatics on capitol hill -- [laughter] force us not to have normal relations with you. >> it's always good to have lunatics on capitol hill. and no danger that will change. [laughter] >> i see no da
of these options required delivering on our promise to america's first responders. even with incentive options on course the demand for our airwaves will continue to grow. to meet this demand, efficiency is critical. at the fcc efficiency means getting all of our options done on a clear timeline. for industry efficiency means squeezing more out of the spectrum already allocated for commercial use. now is the time to invest in technologies, geographic, temporal and cognitive that multiplied the capacity of our air waves. finally for the federal government's efficiency means finding new approaches that facilitate repurchasing of the spectrum better than the old three step process of clearing, relocating and auctioning. to this end i believe it is time to develop a series of incentives to serve as catalysts for freeing more federal spectrum for commercial use. what if we were to financially reward federal authorities for efficient use of their spectrum. if we want to convert more airwaves to commercial use i believe it is time to work with our government partners so they can realize value from us
: the fall of an empire and the making of america's vietnam," frederick logevall. and seth rosenfeld in "subversives," for an extended list of links to various publications 2012 notable book selections, visit booktv's web site, booktv.org, or our facebook page, facebook.com/booktv. >> two familiar faces to regular c-span and booktv watchers, norm ornstein and thomas mann. their most recent book, "it's even worse than it looks: how the american constitutional system collided with the new politics of extremism." mr. ornstein, very quickly, what's the premise of your book? >> first, i have to say, peter, that we've been with c-span since the beginning, and i've got pictures of my office of moderating sessions on the puffth an vest ri of c-span which was a very long time ago. >> and i was on the panel. >> and he was on the panel, with a very young newt gingrich among orrs. [laughter] a very thin newt gingrich, but that's a different story. this is a book about the reality that in the 43 years that the two of us have been immersed in the politics of washington from one end of pennsylvania
camp. working with senator snowe, we brought that little girl to the united states of america. she's alive here today, married and living in an american citizen. so what did olympia snowe do? she saved jobs and she saved lives, and i'm proud to be par part -- work with her. and we're going to miss her. and then there's my good friend, kay bailey hutchison, who's just come to the floor. and i'm glad she's going to be here to hear what i've got to say about her. i hold her in such enormous high esteem. now, senator kay bailey hutchison is known for her competence, her strong character, and being an outstanding champion for texas, an advocate for women, and a real patriot, dedicated to serving our nation. i, too, know her as a dear friend, someone deeply committed to creating that zone of civility among the women of the senate. when senator hutchison arrived in the senate in 1983, this is -- there were -- there were prickly politics beginning to emerge. she had come from the texas legislature and knew the dynamics of a rum and tumble legislative -- a rough and tumble legislative body.
of the new book, called concussions and their kids, america's leading expert on how to protect young athletes and keep sports safe, written with marc hyman who is with us here today as well. so dr. cantu, what is the central thesis of your book here? >> first of all time i would like to thank you in the aspen institute for convening this conference today and for inviting me to participate in it. i think before i answer your question, i would like to start i just simply saying i am pro-sports. i want every sport to be continued and i wanted to be played in greater numbers, and i believe all of the opinions that i hold are trying to have that happen although right now maybe not everybody fully believes it. football's value is the exceptional exercise obtained in playing it. the last time i checked, it was the minutes if not hours of physical activity playing the sport that counts, not the milliseconds of bashing heads. as for the medical director of the national center for catastrophic sports injury research, we track catastrophic sports injuries in this country. 97% of which comes from the spo
of culture. it basically defined in this child molesting aliens out to destroy the fabric of america and show them the commercials and said if we don't get what we want millions of dollars could be spent on commercials just like this. they got what they wanted to give him money. the idea this is not correct team from anthony kennedy was on a different planet in a different universe than the real world of what we face. so there's all of that to do with the marketing model legislation written basically by a signature is biggest plugged right in. it's the gilded age brought up to the 21st century and nothing that we want. i was psyched to find places where i can take issue with tom. so i want to address the question, even if this question. i actually don't believe the right-wing represents the republican party. we have survey after survey that shows a range of issues self identified republicans do not take the same positions. the tea party consists of older voters who have no clue what the right budget would do on an entitlement program they don't want test for themselves, just for others. so it
in america or the world, you know, going forward. >> you know, i'm not that creative or that -- [inaudible] you know, i do think. i wonder when people look back, as we're looking back now, let's say we added something. will they look at what we have written and understand it? we actually thought about things or trying to score a point here? i would hope that we can say that we have made, at least they can say we have a made a positive contribution. as positive as you and i think of those at the convention, those who participated in the debate. they added something. you know, when we do opinions, i don't like to get to the back and forth with my colleagues and quibble. i like at the end of it to say this is what i think we should be looking at or approach we should be taking. that doesn't mean everybody should agree with me or they should change their minds. i just think that what you're trying to do is think it through, and tell them exactly what you think without personal attacks. there is enough of that. but just to add something. i think that we are obligationed, you and me, if we talk
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19